By Ali Boyd Associate Editor, Vol. 22 Over the years, many American athletes have used their position of fame and influence to make political statements.  During the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, African-American sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos made headlines when they accepted their medals with raised fists in the air to represent black power.  In […]

By Asma Husain Associate Editor, Vol. 22 In 2012, Wells Fargo entered into a $175 million settlement after being accused of pursuing discriminatory lending practices. Specifically, the bank and its subsidiaries were accused of charging African Americans and Latinos higher rates and fees on mortgages than their White counterparts. Despite the massive figure of the settlement, […]

By Luis Arias Associate Editor, Vol. 21 Executive Editor, Vol. 22 Minority and low-income students remain underrepresented at most of our nation’s universities. Although many institutional and societal problems contribute to the low minority and low-income student enrollment rates, one contributor is especially troubling. These students lack access to the tools they need to properly navigate the […]

By Dan Cho Associate Editor, Vol. 21 Contributing Editor, Vol. 22 Last December, after the release of a dash cam video showing Jason Van Dyke, a white Chicago police officer, shooting Laquan MacDonald, an unarmed black teenager and in the midst of the subsequent protests, Mayor Rahm Emanuel created a task force to “review the system […]

By Jason Raylesberg Associate Editor, Vol. 21 Contributing  Editor, Vol. 22 It is a very real and terrifying possibility that Donald Trump will be our next president. Accepting that prospect means accepting that the hatred, divisiveness, and racism he has given voice to across America will continue to intensify along with his rise. In recent weeks, that […]

  By A.T. Jordan Associate Editor, Vol. 21 Contributing Editor, Vol. 22 In this Comment I hope to articulate how and why the line of cases culminating in Obergefell v. Hodges[1] can be helpful in challenging racial profiling.  What Obergefell provides is a third way of thinking about discrimination, rooted neither in discriminatory intent or purpose, nor in […]

By Saeeda Joseph-Charles Associate Editor, Vol. 21 After students, faculty, and even lawmakers called for his resignation, the University of Missouri’s system president, Tim Wolfe, finally stepped down earlier this month. On November 2nd, graduate student Jonathan Butler launched a hunger strike, which he said would end with either Wolfe’s resignation or his own death. […]