By Pete Osornio, Associate Editor, Volume 19 I. Diversity (Re)affirmed Grutter v. Bollinger definitively authorized the use of affirmative action policies in higher education,[1] resolving the circuit split[2] that followed the Supreme Court’s fractured opinion in Regents of University of California v. Bakke.[3] In Grutter, the Supreme Court endorsed Justice Powell’s view that diversity is a […]

On Schuette Pete Osornio Associate Editor,  Michigan Journal of Race & Law Volume 19 Yesterday, in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, the Supreme Court upheld a state constitutional amendment prohibiting affirmative action preferences in college admissions, effectively making it more difficult for minorities to rectify the lasting impacts of slavery and discrimination. As a result, there are now […]

A new study by researchers at San Francisco State University finds evidence of skin tone memory bias. Student participants instructed to make a mental association between a picture of an African-American man and the word “educated” tended to misidentify the man on later memory tests as having a lighter skin tone. A recent article in the Atlantic article summarizes […]

Today, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency’s warrantless placement of a GPS device on a vehicle was constitutional because probable cause existed to believe the car was being used for criminal purposes. A three judge panel for the Third Circuit had previously ruled that in […]

The American Civil Liberties Union just released an “extensive and astonishing report” describing the increasing frequency with which American judges are sentencing nonviolent offenders to life in prison without the possibility of parole. You can visit the ACLU’s interactive site here and read the full report here. –Emily Gilman, Editor-in-Chief, Volume 19

This article takes up the issue of creating local economies that are not driven by global capital but instead respond to community needs and are democratically controlled by residents. It highlights that local economies as currently constituted consistently marginalize people of color, and gives a blueprint for how the rules of the game need to […]

The ongoing labor movement to win a living wage for fast food workers implicates both race and law. A recent article in Salon speaks to the way in which the minimum wage level allows corporations to pass off the basic well-being of their employees–many of whom are racial and ethnic minorities–to federal and state government welfare […]

Over the last couple of weeks, the social justice and voting rights communities have been abuzz with the news that Judge Richard A. Posner, who famously held in 2007 that an Indiana voter ID law did not impose an undue burden on voters, has changed his mind. Laws requiring voters to show a valid photo […]