Author Archives: mjrandl

With a Side of Higher Mortality: Prison Food in the United States

By Cleo Hernandez Associate Editor, Volume 23 November begins a holiday season in the United States that is stuffed full of increased attention on food. The average American does seem to gain just under one pound of body weight during … Continue reading

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Can They Do That? (Part 1): Shut Down Line 5

By John Spangler Associate Editor, Volume 23 In the era of the perpetual election cycle, it is no surprise that candidates are already declaring for 2018 races in Michigan.  Michigan’s 4-year, off-presidential elections include the state senate, the governor, and … Continue reading

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UPCOMING EVENT 11/14: The Path to Equitable Revitalization in Detroit

The Michigan Journal of Race & Law presents   The Path to Equitable Revitalization in Detroit:  A Discussion with  Professor Alicia Alvarez   Please join us for a discussion with Professor Alicia Alvarez, director of the Community and Economic Development … Continue reading

Posted in MJR&L Events

The School to Prison Pipeline Comes to Pre-K

By Elliott Gluck Associate Editor, Volume 23 For years, the startling rates of suspensions and expulsions in America’s public schools have raised concerns for stakeholders across the educational landscape.[1] These disciplinary actions are frequently connected with higher drop-out rates, lower … Continue reading

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Resist, Revolt, Rinse, Repeat

By Cleo Hernandez Associate Editor, Volume 23 A public square, angry words, angry people, police in riot gear, torches bright against a night sky, flags, homemade signs and banners, summer heat. Some would say that this is what democracy looks … Continue reading

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American Indian Political Representation: An Update on Congressional Races Across America

By Ben Cornelius Associate Editor, Volume 23   The highest achieving American Indian in U.S. politics was Kaw-Osage-Pottawatomie Charles Curtis. Curtis was the 31st Vice President of the United States serving with President Herbert Hoover.[1] Curtis started his career as a … Continue reading

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UPCOMING EVENT 10/11: Clear Eyes, Full Hearts, Linked Arms: A Panel on the NFL Protests

Is Colin Kaepernick the first to use sports as a platform for protest? How is the First Amendment shaping the debate? Does labor law provide protections for athletes who protest? Join Professors Kate Andrias, Sherman Clark and Len Niehoff as … Continue reading

Posted in MJR&L Events

Registration is now open for MJR&L’s 2018 Symposium: A More Human Dwelling Place: Reimagining the Racialized Architecture of America

Presented by the Michigan Journal of Race & Law, “A More Human Dwelling Place: Reimagining the Racialized Architecture of America” is a symposium happening on February 16 and 17 at the University of Michigan Law School. Over two days, we will … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements, MJR&L Events

Introducing the Volume 23 Associate Editors

Congratulations to the Volume 23 Associate Editors!  The Michigan Journal of Race & Law is beyond excited to have you join our family.  Please give a warm welcome to:   Hira Baig David Bergh Morgan Birck Ben Cornelius Shanene Frederick … Continue reading

Posted in Announcements

Rethinking Death Penalty Reform: The Case Against Death-qualified Juries

By Anonymous Associate Editor

Since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty through Gregg in 1976, racial bias has continued to pervade its administration.[1] 34.5% of defendants executed have been Black and 55.6% have been white,[2] despite the fact that only 13.3% of people in the U.S. identify as Black, while 77.1% identify as white.[3]  I consider myself an abolitionist regarding the death penalty, as I do not think that it is justified for the state to kill a citizen in any circumstance. However, given these alarming statistics and the dire situation they illuminate, I find that efforts to reform the capital process to reduce racial disparity are also worthwhile. Reformers would do well to focus on the elimination of the death qualification process, as well as Eighth Amendment and Batson challenges to the death penalty. Continue reading

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